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Election Reflection

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HTML Version: Election Reflection

Level 1

There is more to an election than a ballot box. In Canada’s Parliament members of the House of Commons are elected through a process that begins long before voting takes place on Election Day.

Think you can work out the steps in this process? Try placing the steps in order using the drop down menus, then compare your selections to the answers listed below.

Candidates campaign to gain support.
General election is launched.
Election results are tallied and announced.
Election Day!
An election is requested.
List of Voters is updated.
New Parliament begins.
Information about the election is circulated.


Level 2

Use the drop down menus to match each list of actions with the correct step. Once you are finished you can compare your selections to the answers listed below.

  1. A local elections office is opened in every riding in the country
  2. Elections Canada workers start to go door to door to register people to vote.
  3. Voter information cards are sent to registered voters.
  4. Reminder cards with information on how to register to vote and the election are sent to every household in Canada.
  5. The election is advertised in newspapers, on television, on the internet and through other media.
  1. Voters who have not yet registered to vote can do so up to and including the day of the election.
  1. New Government and Official Opposition are formed.
  2. Members of Parliament and Cabinet Ministers are sworn in.
  3. The Governor General opens Parliament by reading the Speech from the Throne
  1. Election workers and elections workers count the votes by hand.
  2. Early voting results are available after the polling stations close.
  3. The returning officers verify that the ballots were counted correctly.
  4. When necessary, there is a recount.
  5. Returning officers send the writs, which announce the winning candidate for each riding, back to the Chief Electoral Officer.
  6. Official election results announced
  1. At the request of the Prime Minister, the Governor General dissolves Parliament.
  2. Acting on the advice of the Cabinet, the Governor General sets a date for the election.
  1. The writs of election are printed. The writs announce the nomination deadline and the date of the election.
  2. The Chief Electoral Officer sends a writ to the returning officer for each riding.
  3. The returning officers inform the voters of all important dates and details relating to the election and make preparations to hold an election in their riding.
  4. Political parties begin sending the names of their nominated candidates to the Chief Electoral Officer.
  1. Canadian citizens who are 18 or over can vote at the polling station assigned to their home.
  1. Campaign signs are placed by the candidates and their campaign workers around their riding
  2. The candidate and their campaign workers visit constituents by going door-to-door handing out brochures and discussing their platform
  3. Advertisements for the candidates appear in newspapers, on billboards, on television, on the internet and on the radio
  4. Public meetings and public debates are held


View Answers

Step 1 An election is requested
  1. At the request of the Prime Minister, the Governor General dissolves Parliament.
  2. Acting on the advice of the Cabinet, the Governor General sets a date for the election.
Step 2 General election is launched
  1. The writs of election are printed. The writs announce the nomination deadline and the date of the election.
  2. The Chief Electoral Officer sends a writ to the returning officer for each riding.
  3. The returning officers inform the voters of all important dates and details relating to the election and make preparations to hold an election in their riding.
  4. Political parties begin sending the names of their nominated candidates to the Chief Electoral Officer.
Step 3a* Information about the election is circulated
  1. A local elections office is opened in every riding in the country.
  2. Elections Canada workers start to go door-to-door to register people to vote.
  3. Voter information cards are sent to registered voters.
  4. Reminder cards with information on how to register to vote and the election are sent to every household in Canada.
  5. The election is advertised in newspapers, on television, on the internet and through other media.
Step 3b* Candidates campaign to gain support
  1. Campaign signs are placed by the candidates and their campaign workers around their riding.
  2. The candidate and their campaign workers visit constituents by going door-to-door handing out brochures and discussing their platform.
  3. Advertisements for the candidates appear in newspapers, on billboards, on television, on the internet and on the radio.
  4. Public meetings and public debates are held.
Step 3c* List of Voters is updated
  1. Voters who have not yet registered to vote can do so up to and including the day of the election.
*Did you know that Steps 3a, b and c all happen at the same time? These steps take at least 36 days of preparation and take place between the launch of an election and Election Day.
Step 4 Election Day!
  1. Canadian citizens who are 18 or over can vote at the polling station assigned to their home.
Step 5 Election results are tallied and announced
  1. Election workers count the votes by hand.
  2. Early voting results are available after the polling stations close.
  3. The returning officers verify that the ballots were counted correctly.
  4. When necessary, there is a recount.
  5. Returning officers send the writs, which announce the winning candidate for each riding, back to the Chief Electoral Officer.
  6. Official election results are announced.
Step 6 New Parliament begins
  1. New Government and Official Opposition are formed.
  2. Members of Parliament and Cabinet Ministers are sworn in.
  3. The Governor General opens Parliament by reading the Speech from the Throne.